The Inconvenience Of ID Cards

ALEJANDRO GONZALEZ

AMANDA CIROCCO

Young Rachel was sprinting through the middle of the quad. It was 2:00 a.m. The frigid night time breeze inadvertently made her lips shiver; it was indeed a cold night. Once she finally arrives at her residence, Rachel relentlessly tries locating her Manhattanville ID card from her bag. She struggles to find it. Unfortunately, forgetful Rachel has left her ID inside of the Mac Lab, which she can’t access at the moment because she needs her card in the first place to get into the said Mac Lab. And so, young Rachel freezes in the heartless climate as the devil performs his sonata.

If you’re a resident, commuter, or even a professor, then you probably own a Manhattanville ID card. And if you’ve had the luxury of owning an ID then you probably have had the luxury of losing one, too, and when that happens it completely sucks.

Like many other institutions, Manhattanville College has the ability to host a plethora of people and by having the ability to do so it also requires constant defense and surveillance against the outsiders who aren’t meant to be there. Traditional identification cards perform this job quite well, but are a real inconvenience to those who innocently forget them; either inside a back pocket of jeans you just placed in the washer, or just imperceptible in between the sheets.

The IDs can be placed in one’s wallet or purse, but eventually, that person will go through the tiresomeness of having to constantly take their wallet or purse out, which is tempting fate for an accident. Lanyards are offered but don’t seem to o er a popular fashion style among the community.

These cards are the same  shape and size as traditional credit or debit cards in your wallet, so they could easily be lost in the clutter if you have a lot, or it could just easily fall from your pockets as you enter a building—and once you realize you lost your ID it would have proved too late.

IDs are a mandated use in  many facets of everyday life in the ‘Ville. Students need it to enter through residential buildings, gain accessibility to facilities like the Mac Lab, dance studio, and library after 8:00 p.m., as well as to get food from the Cafeteria or Pub. When you lose your ID and you want it replaced, it costs ten dollars, which is kind of steep if I am being honest. Nevertheless, we pay for convenience.

Where the problem lies is that we used to be able to replace our lost ID in a second notice if the old rules were still in place, where students could replace their IDs straight through campus safety. Instead, if you’re getting your ID replaced, one has to go to the Student Accounts Office in the Castle to get a receipt so you can then go to Campus Safety to receive a replacement. My main problem with that system is that the Student Accounts office closes around five on the weekdays and remains closed during the weekend. That leaves a lot of time for a person to lose his or her ID and not be able to get it replaced due to the rules.

With the strict rules enforced this year, if you don’t have identification you can’t enter the facilities. So, essentially if you lost your ID you can’t leave the campus in fear they will give you a hard time getting back in. You also will have difficulty grabbing a meal to eat because you are no longer allowed to give out an ID number affiliated with your own card to pay for your meals. Lastly, without an

ID, we can’t even get inside our dormitory.

So what do I suggest? Well, it’s rather simple. Remove card requirements for the entrance of dormitory buildings. Perhaps implant a chip which can track your cards location. Maybe investing be er technological advancements than a simply breakable plastic card.